Landline No. - 011 - 28755842

Shopping cart - Cart Subtotal:$ 0

Diamonds for Everyone

Diamond History

Color

The color of a diamond has the second biggest impact on its price, after carat weight. Did you know that diamonds come in every color of the rainbow?

Grading "colorless" diamonds involves deciding how closely a stones body color approaches colorlessness. Most diamonds have at least a trace of yellow or brown body color. The reason colorlessness is most highly valued is that diamonds in these ranges act like prisms, separating white light passing through it into a wide spectrum of colors.

The more transparent the diamond, the wider the spectrum of colors. Chemical "impurities" in the diamond will filter out some of the colors which in turn reduce the "fire" effect when light bounces back out of the diamond and into your eyes.

Other than "fancy colors". Colorless diamonds tend to be more valuable. Rare colors such as blue, pink, purple, or red tend to be very expensive...and very beautiful.

Describes the "yellowness" of a stone. The color scale ranges from D (colorless) to Z (deep yellow). Grading color in the normal range involves deciding how closely a diamonds body color approaches colorlessness. Most diamonds have at least a trace of yellow or brown body color. With the exception of some natural fancy colors, such as blue, pink, purple, or red, the colorless grade is the most valuable.

When discussing the topic of color in diamonds, you need to differentiate between mostly "colorless" diamonds and "fancy color" diamonds. Diamonds are graded on a color scale established by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA), ranging from D (colorless) to Z.

The most respected system used today for evaluating diamond color was developed by the Gemological Institute of America, (GIA).

Even though there are several grades in each category, there are slight differences between the letter grades. D is the clearest and most valuable, X is a dingy yellow and least expensive. Z grade-colored diamonds are the rarest and most expensive. A diamond so saturated with nitrogen that it becomes a deep, rich yellow is as rare as a colorless diamond.

Cut

Diamond cutting is the art and science of creating a gem-quality diamond out of mined rough. The cut of a diamond describes the manner in which a diamond has been shaped and polished from its beginning form as a rough stone to its final gem proportions. The cut of a diamond describes the quality of workmanship and the angles to which a diamond is cut. Often diamond cut is confused with "shape".

There are mathematical guidelines for the angles and length ratios at which the diamond is supposed to be cut in order to reflect the maximum amount of light. Round brilliant diamonds, the most common, are guided by these specific guidelines, though fancy cut stones are not able to be as accurately guided by mathematical specifics.

The techniques for cutting diamonds have been developed over hundreds of years, with perhaps the greatest achievements made in 1919 by mathematician and gem enthusiast Marcel Tolkowsky. He developed the round brilliant cut by calculating the ideal shape to return and scatter light when a diamond is viewed from above. The modern round brilliant has 57 facets (polished faces), counting 33 on the crown (the top half), and 24 on the pavilion (the lower half). The girdle is the thin middle part. The function of the crown is to diffuse light into various colors and the pavilions function to reflect light back through the top of the diamond.

For more information about 4Cs Diamonds please visit this page: Diamond Tutorial

  Loading...